{{ hero.title }}

Important Notes

Tips

Colors

  1. Color Formulas: Head over to our Color Formulas page to find over 500 color formulas.
  2. Pantone Seasonal Colors: Each Spring and Fall, Pantone releases its seasonal on-trend colors. You can find color formulas to match these colors by going to our Color Formulas page, selecting the dye type and then using the “Pantone Collections” dropdown to select your preferred season.
  3. Vintage Colors: Just because an old color of ours was discontinued doesn’t mean it’s gone forever! You can find color formulas to match all of our discontinued colors by going to our Color Formulas page, selecting the dye type and then using the “All Collections” dropdown to select “Vintage Colors.”

Mixing Colors

  1. Dye Method: The sink or bucket or stovetop method are the best for mixing colors, letting you easily tweak dye amounts to get just the right color. However, our color formulas will also work in a washer. If you are using Rit DyeMore for Synthetics to dye a synthetic fabric (fabrics containing more than 35% polyester, acrylic or acetate), then you must use the stovetop method.
  2. Scaling: All formulas are automatically scalable to meet your needs. Just select the dyebath size that fits the item you are dyeing and the formula will automatically update.
  3. If Using Powder Dye: All formulas on our Color Formulas page are developed using liquid dye. If you are using powder dye, please reference the conversion chart below when mixing colors.
  4. Testing Colors: We strongly recommend testing the color of your dyebath before dyeing.
    1. Dye Type:
      1. If you are using Rit All-Purpose Dye, the most realistic test would be to use a scrap piece of fabric from the garment you are dyeing. However, you can also test color by dipping a paper towel into the dyebath. Paper towel is made of fibers that react to the dye in a similar way that cotton would.
      2. If you are using Rit DyeMore Synthetic Dye, we recommend first heating up the dyebath on your stove to almost boiling. The most realistic test would be to use a scrap piece of fabric from the garment you are dyeing and leave it in the dyebath for 5 minutes. If a scrap piece of fabric isn’t available, then use a fabric swatch that has a similar fiber makeup as the garment (if available). Unfortunately, due to the complexities of dyeing synthetics, using a paper towel to test color will not give you a close representation of how the color will appear on your synthetic garment. It is worth a try if you do not have a fabric swatch available, but please keep in mind that it won’t provide you with an exact match.
    2. If the color is too light, add more dye; if the color is too dark, add more water. If more dye is needed, add dye in increments of 1/4 to 1 teaspoon, depending upon the recipe or amount of fabric being dyed. If the color is too dark, add hot water in 1 to 2 cup increments, depending upon the size of the dyebath and the amount of fabric being dyed.

Powder to Liquid Conversion Chart

All formulas on our Color Formulas page are developed using liquid dye. If you are using powder dye, please reference this conversion chart.

Powder Liquid
1/16 teaspoon 1/4 teaspoon
1/8 teaspoon 1/2 teaspoon
1/4 teaspoon 1 teaspoon
1/2 teaspoon 2 teaspoons
3/4 teaspoon 1 Tablespoon (3 teaspoons)
1 teaspoon 4 teaspoons
1 1/4 teaspoon 5 teaspoons
1 1/2 teaspoons 2 Tablespoons (6 teaspoons)
 1 Tablespoon  1/4 Cup (4 Tablespoons)
1 1/2 Tablespoons 6 Tablespoons
1 Package 1/2 Cup
2 Packages 1 Bottle
4 Packages 2 Bottles
6 Packages 3 Bottles
8 Packages 4 Bottles

 

We send awesome emails.

We send awesome emails.

Be the first to know about promotions, new products, projects and more!
{{ formErrors('newsletter-modal', 'email') }}
{{ formErrors('newsletter-modal', 'other') }}
Thank you for subscribing!
Thank you for subscribing!